Difference between revisions of "Annie W. Walker"

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'''Annie W. Walker''' (1874-1960) ran unsuccessfully for a seat on the city council in the [[1922 election]].  
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'''Annie W. Walker''' (1874-1960) was a business owner and ran unsuccessfully for a seat on the city council in the [[1922 election]]. She is most notable as the first woman to run for a seat on the city council after the ratification of the 19th amendment in [[1920]].  
  
 
In the [[June 13]], [[1922]] election, Annie ran unsuccessfully as a candidate for one of the three seats available on the Charlottesville City Commissioner (precursor to the current five seat city council). She placed seventh in a seven-way race.
 
In the [[June 13]], [[1922]] election, Annie ran unsuccessfully as a candidate for one of the three seats available on the Charlottesville City Commissioner (precursor to the current five seat city council). She placed seventh in a seven-way race.
 
::Born two years after the [[1922 election]], [[Jill Rinehart]] (1920-2014) was the first woman elected to the Charlottesville City Council - serving from 1972 to 1976. [[Nancy O'Brien]] became the city's first female mayor in [[1976]].
 
  
 
''"Mrs. Walker’s small vote of less than a hundred indicated that as yet the local public is not prepared to take kindly to the idea of electing women as office holders, although the records show that there are some fifty more registered women voters than men."'' https://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2122163/view#openLayer/uva-lib:2122164/3294.5/4009.5/2/1/0  
 
''"Mrs. Walker’s small vote of less than a hundred indicated that as yet the local public is not prepared to take kindly to the idea of electing women as office holders, although the records show that there are some fifty more registered women voters than men."'' https://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2122163/view#openLayer/uva-lib:2122164/3294.5/4009.5/2/1/0  
  
 
June 4, 1919 - The U.S. Congress passes the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment guarantees women the right to vote. The Equal Suffrage League of Virginia was created in 1909. The primary goal of this group was to achieve equal voting rights for women in the state of Virginia. After women were given the right to vote, through the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the organization was renamed the Virginia League of Women Voters.
 
June 4, 1919 - The U.S. Congress passes the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment guarantees women the right to vote. The Equal Suffrage League of Virginia was created in 1909. The primary goal of this group was to achieve equal voting rights for women in the state of Virginia. After women were given the right to vote, through the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the organization was renamed the Virginia League of Women Voters.
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In 1923, she held the office of secretary of the Walker-Sandridge Motor Corporation.<ref>https://books.google.com/books?id=ye4lAQAAIAAJ&pg=PA120&lpg=PA120&dq=Annie+W.+Walker+charlottesville+va&source=bl&ots=CjanTRBBID&sig=ACfU3U3ytWoD5WMTNlYSosCtQa47kZrjxQ&hl=en&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwiX_rXAzbToAhWkZDUKHeLxDf0Q6AEwAHoECA0QAQ#v=onepage&q=Annie%20W.%20Walker%20charlottesville%20va&f=false</ref>
  
 
Annie W. Walker is buried in Maplewood Cemetery.
 
Annie W. Walker is buried in Maplewood Cemetery.
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*In [[1972]], fifty years after the [[1922 election]], [[Jill Rinehart]] (1920-2014) became the first woman elected to the Charlottesville City Council - serving from 1972 to 1976.
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*In [[1976]], [[Nancy K. O'Brien]] became the city's first women mayor appointed by the City Council.
 
==References==
 
==References==
 
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Revision as of 23:08, 24 March 2020

Annie W. Walker (1874-1960) was a business owner and ran unsuccessfully for a seat on the city council in the 1922 election. She is most notable as the first woman to run for a seat on the city council after the ratification of the 19th amendment in 1920.

In the June 13, 1922 election, Annie ran unsuccessfully as a candidate for one of the three seats available on the Charlottesville City Commissioner (precursor to the current five seat city council). She placed seventh in a seven-way race.

"Mrs. Walker’s small vote of less than a hundred indicated that as yet the local public is not prepared to take kindly to the idea of electing women as office holders, although the records show that there are some fifty more registered women voters than men." https://search.lib.virginia.edu/catalog/uva-lib:2122163/view#openLayer/uva-lib:2122164/3294.5/4009.5/2/1/0

June 4, 1919 - The U.S. Congress passes the Nineteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution. The amendment guarantees women the right to vote. The Equal Suffrage League of Virginia was created in 1909. The primary goal of this group was to achieve equal voting rights for women in the state of Virginia. After women were given the right to vote, through the ratification of the 19th Amendment in 1920, the organization was renamed the Virginia League of Women Voters.

In 1923, she held the office of secretary of the Walker-Sandridge Motor Corporation.[1]

Annie W. Walker is buried in Maplewood Cemetery.

  • In 1972, fifty years after the 1922 election, Jill Rinehart (1920-2014) became the first woman elected to the Charlottesville City Council - serving from 1972 to 1976.
  • In 1976, Nancy K. O'Brien became the city's first women mayor appointed by the City Council.

References


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