July 1

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Significant events that happened (or will happen) on July 1.

Events

  • 2018 – Hundreds of new laws took effect in Virginia - longer recess for students, legalized slots-like betting machines, and looser regulations on bringing dogs to wineries are a few of the new Virginia laws going into effect this Sunday.
    • Texting while driving: Virginia drivers who are caught texting or reading emails while driving through a work zone when workers are present will be subjected to a mandatory $250 fine.
    • DNA samples: Virginians convicted of certain misdemeanor violations, including trespassing and assault, will be required to provide a blood, saliva or tissue sample for DNA analysis.
    • Vets and the opioid epidemic: A new law requires veterinarians who dispense controlled substances to submit information about the animal and its owner to the state's prescription monitoring program.
    • Felony threshold: Virginia passed a law that will soften the penalties for people caught stealing smaller-dollar items, raising the felony threshold from $200 to $500. Virginia has kept its felony bar at $200 since 1980 and was tied with New Jersey for the lowest in the country.
    • Hunting raccoons: A new law repeals the prohibition on hunting or killing raccoons after 2 a.m. on Sundays. [1]
  • 2019 Charlottesville City Council designated March 3 as Liberation and Freedom Day an official holiday [2]
  • 2020Cale Elementary School will become known as Mountain View Elementary [3]
  • 2020JAUNT took over operations and administration of Greene County Transit [4]
  • 2020 – Hundreds of new laws took effect throughout Virginia this Wednesday.
    • Voters no longer need a reason to apply for an absentee mail ballot.
    • The commonwealth of Virginia will no longer recognize Lee-Jackson Day as a state holiday, in favor of making Election Day one instead. Charlottesville, along with other Virginia cities such as Richmond, Fredericksburg, Blacksburg, Newport News, Hampton, Winchester and Fairfax, had decided in recent years to not officially observe the holiday.[5]
    • Communities in Virginia will be allowed to ban firearms at public events, something that wasn't possible for Charlottesville officials at the Unite the Right rally on August 12, 2017.[6]
      • Historical Context: The 2019 elections took place on November 5, 2019, The Democratic Party won majorities in both the House of Delegates and the Senate, giving them control of both houses and the governor's mansion in Virginia for the first time since 1994.

Deaths

Business openings


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References

  1. Web. New laws set to go into effect in Virginia on July 1, By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, VIRGINIA GOVERNMENT & POLITICS, By THE ASSOCIATED PRESS, The Virginia-Pilot, JUN 30, 2018 AT 10:29 AM, retrieved July 4, 2020.
  2. Web. Agenda for July 1, 2019 City Council Meeting, Council Agenda, Charlottesville City Council Clerk, retrieved March 1, 2021.
  3. Web. Sutherland naming advisory committee appointed, Katherine Knott, Daily Progress, Lee Enterprises, February 26, 2020, retrieved March 1, 2020. Print. February 26, 2020 page A3.
  4. Web. Greene County Transit now under Jaunt, Staff reports, Daily Progress, Lee Enterprises, July 1, 2020, retrieved July 4, 2020.
  5. Web. A roundup of new Virginia laws taking effect at the start of July, Caleb Stewart, Gun control, fuel taxes, marijuana decriminalization, Equal Rights Amendment, and more, WHSV, Harrisonburg, VA, Jun. 26, 2020 at 6:17 PM EDT, retrieved July 4, 2020.
  6. Web. New laws to go into effect July 1, Courteney Stuart, CBS19 NEWS, Richmond, VA, June 30th, 5:35 PM EDT, Updated: June 30th, 6:29 PM EDT, retrieved July 4, 2020.
  7. Print: Elements, Election Top News, Daniel W. Lehman, Daily Progress, Worrell Newspaper group January 1, 1986, Page A10.

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