Randolph Louis White

From Cvillepedia
Jump to: navigation, search
Celebrate250logo.jpg This is a featured article. Learn more about Charlottesville's 250th Anniversary in cvillepedia.


Randolph Louis White was the founder of The Tribune.[1] He died on October 28, 1991.[1]

Early Life

He was born on October 2, 1896 in Bridgewater.[1] He attended high school in Columbus, Ohio. White worked as a machinist until 1919 and then joined the U.S. Army.[1]

Military Career

White was part of the Ninth Calvary Regiment and trained at Camp Sherman.[1] He was then moved to the Philippines where he served as a clerk and worked for the judge advocate.[1] He was eventually promoted to sergeant.[1] He voluntarily discharged from the army in 1928 and returned to working as a machinist.[1]

Return to Virginia

White returned to Virginia in 1931 and became employed as a janitor at the University of Virginia Hospital.[1] In 1949 he was given the opportunity to start training in inhalation therapy at Children's Hospital in Washington.[1] He completed his studies at Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and returned to UVA as supervisor to the oxygen therapy department.[1] White worked at the hospital for 33 years.[1] He was the first black Southerner to be accepted into the American Association of Inhalation Therapists.[1]

The Tribune

White founded The Tribune in 1954. It was the Charlottesville-Albemarle's premier African-American newspaper.[1] White said that the best story he ever ran was about Martin Luther King's funeral in Atlanta.[1]

Personal Life

White loved music, especially jazz.[1] His wife was a registered nurse.[1] White's heritage included Black, Cherokee and German.[1]

References

  1. 1.00 1.01 1.02 1.03 1.04 1.05 1.06 1.07 1.08 1.09 1.10 1.11 1.12 1.13 1.14 1.15 1.16 1.17 Web. Yesteryears: Randolph White, Davis Maurer, The Daily Progress, 29 July 2012, retrieved 30 July 2012.

External Links